Cialis and Other Drugs to Go Generic Soon

    Cialis, manufactured by Eli Lilly & Co., contains tadalafil, an Erectile Dysfunction drug.

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    According to the American College of Physicians’ best practices guidelines, all clinicians are recommended to start prescribing generic medicines in order to improve adherence to prescription drugs and clinical outcomes, and more importantly, to lower healthcare spending.

    The members of the association said prescribing generic medications over expensive brand-name counterparts could help patients and insurers to save money.

    It has been found that brand-name medications account for 79 percent of all drug spending, while generic drugs account for 90 percent of all prescriptions.

    Many people in the United States are affected by skyrocketing drug prices, prompting health officials to consider prescribing generic drugs. In fact, they say more affordable drugs could lead to better medication adherence, resulting in better clinical outcomes.

    So, in order to improve therapy adherence, better clinical outcomes, and cost-savings, some of the most commonly prescribed brand-name drugs will soon be prescribed in generics, including erectile dysfunction (ED) drug – Cialis.

    Actively composed of tadalafil, Cialis has given impotent men a new lease on their sexual health. Generic tadalafil has already hit the shelves in September 2017 in many countries and it may available soon in the United States.

    Like Viagra (sildenafil), Cialis is extremely effective at treating ED. However, Cialis has a much longer duration of action than Viagra. Post-dosage, Cialis may last up to 36 hours, while Viagra lasts up to four to five hours.

    In addition, doctors may prescribe Cialis on a daily basis in lower potency or “on-demand” basis in relatively high potency. Daily Cialis is prescribed in 2.5 mg strength and “on-demand” Cialis in 10 mg or 20 mg potency.

    The cost of generic tadalafil 2.5 mg is around $12 for a 30-day supply, while brand Cialis costs about $314 for a 30-day supply, a 96 percent reduction of the average retail price. Other drugs that have already or are set to go generics include Lyrica (pregabalin), Januvia (sitagliptin), Amitiza (lubiprostone), Chantix (varenicline), Zubsolv (buprenorphine/naloxone), and Zipsor (diclofenac).